How I Freelance: Shea Karssing

How I Freelance: Shea Karssing

Shea Karssing is breaking down borders.

She freelances from her home in South Africa, working with an eclectic list of clients from countries around the world. She’s also showing others how to build their own international solo businesses with her new book, Freelance Like A Boss.

Read on to discover more about Shea’s work as a writer and the framework she uses to work smarter, not harder in her freelance business.

When did you start freelancing?

I started freelancing in 2017 for the freedom, flexibility and income potential. And to satisfy my independent and rebellious streak.

What are your niches – and how did you choose them?

I love variety, so I don’t focus on specific industries. You could say I’m somewhat niche-resistant!

I will say that I’ve refined my offering over time based on what I enjoy doing. I used to offer other marketing services like brand strategy, Google Ads, editing, social media management, etc., which I no longer do. Now I focus on doing what I love – getting paid to write.

Who are the clients you work with?

Again, variety is the spice of my life! That’s why I love working with agencies. I get one point of contact for multiple brands.

What types of projects do you work on?

My main focus is writing thought leadership articles, blogs, website copy, emails, video scripts, flyers, advertising copy, etc.

In one week, I can write:

🔸An OpEd about business downscaling
🔸Homepage copy for a steel company
🔸A video script for a salt company
🔸Website copy for a gym gear company
🔸Corporate documents for a gifting company 
🔸A blog on healthcare training
🔸A real estate portfolio
🔸A blog on hybrid work
🔸Social media posts for a marketing agency, CPA and L&D company
🔸Blogs and website copy on email marketing
🔸A blog on tax deductions
🔸Website copy for a smart sewer sensor
🔸An article on regenerative agriculture
🔸Website edits for a luxury branding agency
🔸A new page for my own website

Where do you freelance from?

My home in Hilton, South Africa. I’m obsessed with wearing activewear exclusively and can honestly say I don’t miss an office environment at all.

Tell us about two tools you rely on to run your business.

My second screen. How does anyone work without one? Plus Toggl time tracking, which has helped me price my services, learn to value my time and track my progress and profitability.

Name one thing that’s surprised you about freelancing.

The supportive community of other freelancers out there, across borders. Community > competition. I love how we share insights, work, referrals and get the chance to bitch to one another in a safe space.

Made any big mistakes during your freelance journey?

Saying “yes” to projects I should be saying “no” to – either because they’re not in my sphere of expertise, don’t pay enough or I know I won’t enjoy them. It always ends up a drag that I regret.

What are you proudest of with your business?

The fact that I’m learning to say “no” and take advantage of my freelance freedoms.

And writing Freelance Like a Boss, the book I wish I had when I started freelancing.

Freelance Like a Boss

There’s lots of advice out there for freelancers. What advice do you agree with?

Don’t settle for poverty wages. There are still good gigs out there that will pay you what you deserve. (If you don’t know what that number is, try my Freelance Rates Calculator.)

Your network and your portfolio are your two best marketing tools.

If you’re worried about the impact of AI, focus on the human-centered skills and expertise the bots can’t replicate. If you’re a content writer, for example, what unique opinions and real-life examples can you add? How can you upskill and add to your human-centered skills? What value-add will make you irresistible to clients?

Deliver great work on time, every time, and go over and above to become an irreplaceable service provider.

Remember that the best clients are those who trust YOUR expertise and want to put the highest quality work out there. You can probably afford to lose those who don’t.

The life of your dreams isn’t going to land in your lap. You need to make it happen.

What common advice do you disagree with?

That you have to be in a rush to niche down, or that finding a niche means finding a target industry. I love the way I work.

Deliver great work on time, every time, and go over and above to become an irreplaceable service provider.

What areas of opportunities do you see for current or future freelancers?

I wrote Freelance Like a Boss because I genuinely believe in the power of the freelance economy to help South Africa claw its way out of its gaping unemployment hole.

With borders broken by the speed of international communication networks, I’m obsessed with the idea that anyone can work from anywhere, for anyone around the world.

Anything else you’d like to share?

I’m on a mission to work smart, not hard! Over the years, I’ve upped my income by 55% with 20% less time. The turning point for me was optimizing three things:

⌛ Taking control of my TIME
🧰 Using automation TOOLS
💰 Increasing my TAKINGS

I call them the Triple-T Freelance Freedom Pillars.

It’s still a work in progress, but I keep getting closer to my ideal freelance freedom.

Anyone who wants to join me on my journey and steal my strategy to get there sooner than the six years it took me is welcome to download the “Work Smart, Not Hard” workbook, which outlines my topic tactics to optimize the Triple-T Freelance Freedom Pillars.

Want to connect with Shea? Find her online at sheakarssing.com or connect with her on LinkedIn or Twitter/X. You can also join her group “Freelancers Who Work Smart, Not Hard” on Facebook.

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How I Freelance: Mary Knowles Tindall

How I Freelance: Mary Knowles Tindall

After freelancing off and on for several years, Mary Knowles Tindall launched her content agency in 2018. She’s carved out a unique niche, assisting healthcare companies in developing content for B2B sales.

As an agency owner, Mary encourages even solo business owners to think of themselves as CEOs. She also thinks freelancers who take the time to upskill and pursue specialized work will see the most success in the coming years.

Read on to learn more about her journey to agency owner and how she’s helping new freelancers break into the healthcare niche.

When did you start freelancing?

I’ve been freelancing off and on for more than a decade, but I officially started my business in 2018. Today I run a niche content marketing agency specializing in B2B healthcare.

I earn a full-time income from my business, although I work part-time hours. This is my family’s main income stream.

Why did you choose to pursue freelance work?

As a mom of four young children, I craved more control over my schedule. I also wanted the ability to choose my clients, teammates and projects.

What is your niche and how did you choose it?

Our niche is B2B healthcare, and we often work with clients in the life sciences space, which is like a cousin to healthcare. We sometimes take on projects outside our industry niche if they sound really interesting.

I’ve been interested in the business of healthcare for a long time. Working in media relations at my last job, I got a lot of exposure to the business strategy of a major health system in our region. That experience whetted my appetite for working with movers and shakers in healthcare.

Over time, I gravitated to working with vendors in the healthcare space and writing content for their buyers, rather than patient-facing content. That’s when I decided to specialize in the B2B healthcare niche.

Who are the clients you work with?

Healthcare is extremely broad. We’ve worked with clients all over the map, in areas like healthcare fintech, clinical workflow technology, medical staffing firms, clinical research organizations and companies in the venture capital space. We’re very fortunate to partner with such a variety of clients doing meaningful, important work in the world.

What types of projects do you work on?

We specialize in buyer/sales enablement, which means we create assets that support the B2B sales process. This often includes white papers, ebooks, guides and thought leadership articles. We also consult with clients on their content strategy – some clients have one in place already, while others turn to us for help defining their strategy.

Where do you freelance from?

I live and work in Central Florida, about an hour north of the theme parks.

Tell us about two tools you rely on to run your business.

I use Voxer, which is a walkie-talkie app, to communicate with our project manager and my business besties. My other go-to is Fathom for recording and transcribing my Zoom calls. I don’t know how we ever survived without fast, affordable transcription tools!

Name one thing that’s surprised you about freelancing.

When I started my business, I expected to replace my income, but I wasn’t really dreaming of much more. What I didn’t fully appreciate at the time is that business ownership removes the cap on your earning potential. The harder and smarter you work, the more money you make.

Of course, that’s true as an employee to an extent, but it’s always somewhat out of your hands. Owning your business makes the relationship between your achievements and income much more direct. Being the owner puts you in the driver’s seat to grow as much (or as little) as you want to.

It’s imperative for freelancers to upskill into more specialized, in-demand types of work and stop trying to compete for commodity content gigs.

Made any big mistakes during your freelance journey?

I’m task-oriented by nature. When my kids were very young, staying head-down on client projects was a necessity because I had limited time to work. I wish I’d invested more time into building my own platform and acting as a CEO, rather than dedicating all my efforts to client work. That’s something I’m catching up on now.

What are you proudest of with your business?

I’m proud of my initiative and ability to self-educate. I also think it takes courage and tenacity to show up for your business, day in and day out. It’s an emotional rollercoaster at times. So I’m proud of myself for that, too.

There’s lots of advice out there for freelancers. What advice do you agree with?

Relationships are key. When I talk with aspiring freelancers, I often emphasize the power of a few solid relationships to build your client base. I’ve had many mentors and peers who have helped me get to this stage in my career. We can’t go it alone.

What common advice do you disagree with?

It’s not really advice, but I disagree with the sentiment that owning a freelance business is objectively better than being an employee. It’s such an individual decision. For me, it’s the right choice, but the tradeoffs are real.

What areas of opportunities do you see for current or future freelancers?

I’m bullish on B2B healthcare as a niche, and I’m actually leading a coaching cohort on breaking into that niche as a freelance writer.

Overall, I think it’s imperative for freelancers to upskill into more specialized, in-demand types of work and stop trying to compete for commodity content gigs.

We also need to understand the broader marketing mix so we can contribute more strategically. The marketing field is evolving incredibly fast. It’s critical to invest in professional development, whether that’s conferences, courses, mentorship or staying on top of industry news.

Find Mary and her agency online at calliopecomms.com or connect with her on LinkedIn. You can also learn more about her B2B Healthcare Marketing Course at breakintob2b.com

How I Freelance: Brittany VanDerBill

How I Freelance: Brittany VanDerBill

Working in the insurance industry gave Brittany VanDerBill two things: certainty that she didn’t want to work in the corporate world and a built-in niche for her marketing and consulting business when she went freelance.

Today, Brittany has pivoted to freelance writing and expanded her niches. Read on to discover how going independent gave her the flexibility, freedom and income she was seeking.

When did you start freelancing?

I started freelancing in 2015 as a marketing consultant, then began my pivot to freelance writing in 2019.

I had a part-time work-from-home job alongside my freelance business for the first few years, then went full-time freelance in 2021.

Why did you choose to pursue freelance work?

I spent about five years as an insurance agent. After the unexpected death of my boss and mentor in 2015, I realized that owning an agency and jumping through corporate hoops wasn’t what I wanted for my life. I translated my marketing and networking skills into a job with a nonprofit, but started freelancing when it was clear that job wasn’t a fit for me.

All of that to say: I choose to freelance because of the flexibility and freedom it gives me. It also doesn’t hurt that I earn more as a freelancer than I ever did as an employee!

What are your niches – and how did you choose them?

I’d say my niches are travel, personal finance/insurance and lifestyle.

I love traveling and writing about it, so that was an easy one. I have five years of experience as an insurance agent, so writing about insurance and finance topics comes pretty naturally as well. And lifestyle writing encompasses a broad range of topics, which adds variety to my work and keeps me on my toes.

Who are the clients you work with?

I think of my writing business as having two “sides.” On one side, I write web copy, press releases and blogs for marketing agencies’ clients and for businesses directly.

On the other side, I write for publications like Travel + Leisure, Insider, HerMoney, Better Homes & Gardens, Subaru Drive, Entertainment Weekly and more.

Generally, I write web copy, blogs, press releases, emails and articles. Depending on a client’s or publication’s need, I might incorporate some SEO work.

Where do you freelance from?

I work from my home office in rural Minnesota. I’m especially thankful for my home office during our brutal winters!

Tell us about two tools you rely on to run your business.

Well, I always have pen and paper at the ready. But I also rely on Trello for project management.

Name one thing that’s surprised you about freelancing.

The pricing conversation still isn’t easy, even after 8+ years of freelancing. It’s much better than when I started, but it still feels a bit uncomfortable.

I choose to freelance because of the flexibility and freedom it gives me. It also doesn’t hurt that I earn more as a freelancer than I ever did as an employee!

Made any big mistakes during your freelance journey?

Not enforcing boundaries. When I first started freelancing, I would answer client calls or emails whenever they came in, and I would allow all kinds of scope creep. These days, I’m better at setting boundaries up front and sticking to them – though that’s still a work in progress!

What are you proudest of with your business?

Probably how far I’ve come since I started in 2015, and that I had the guts to start a business and keep going. Since 2019, I’ve come a long way – I’ve increased my income (most years) and added several bylines that only felt like a distant possibility when I started focusing on my writing.

Also, I have to give credit to my awesome husband. He’s incredibly supportive and I wouldn’t have the business I do today without him.

There’s lots of advice out there for freelancers. What advice do you agree with?

Set boundaries, both with clients and with yourself. I also subscribe to the idea that freelancers should take time off. I take as much time off as I possibly can.

What common advice do you disagree with?

I vehemently disagree with the “hustle 24/7” mentality. If that works for people, then that’s great. But that’s also a recipe for burnout for many people, including me, so I don’t support it.

What areas of opportunities do you see for current or future freelancers?

I’m seeing opportunities in the editing space and commerce writing space, in terms of openings for freelance work.

Anything else you’d like to share with us?

I’ve found it immensely helpful to network with other writers. I’m a member of several writers’ groups on Facebook and a paid member of the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA). This year has been a weird one, and it’s so helpful to know it’s not just me. Freelancing can be somewhat lonely at times, so connecting with other writers can be a sanity saver.

Want to connect with Brittany? Find her online at bvanderbillconsulting.com, connect on LinkedIn or follow her on Instagram or Facebook.

How I Freelance: Michelle Garrett

How I Freelance: Michelle Garrett

When Michelle went full-time freelance in 1999, she was on the leading edge of the trend toward independent contracting. She quickly found her groove as a public relations consultant, working with tech and manufacturing companies to share their unique stories.

Nearly 25 years later, Michelle’s PR strategy and writing business is still going strong. She freely shares her PR expertise and insights as a frequently requested podcast guest and article contributor. She’s also a supportive voice for other freelancers on social media, and her weekly chat has provided a place for freelancers to gather knowledge and get encouragement over the past five years.

When did you start freelancing?

I launched my consulting practice in 1999. I went full-time freelance from Day 1.

Why did you choose to pursue freelance work?

I had always wanted to work for myself. I planned my escape from the corporate world for years.

I wanted to make sure I had the experience I needed, so I worked for all types of organizations before going out on my own: big companies, small businesses, nonprofits and finally an agency. (My mentor suggested I do that – it was valuable experience and really helped me succeed as a consultant.)

Both my parents were self-employed, so I grew up in a house where no one ever went to work for anyone else. Maybe it was in my blood to work for myself.

I think I also envisioned a workday where I didn’t have to sit in a cubicle from 8 to 5 in order to get work done and be successful.

Long before freelancing became “hot,” I saw that I could make self-employment work for me. I tried without much success to get employers to allow me more flexibility – like maybe working from home one day a week or leaving early on Fridays.

So it does my heart good to see what’s happening now, with workers pretty much demanding more flexibility. It really should have been this way; we shouldn’t have had to live and work through a pandemic to prove that flexible working arrangements could be effective.

What are your niche(s)?

As far as vertical industries, I specialize in working with B2B clients. Within B2B, I enjoy working with clients in the manufacturing, industrial and technology sectors.

As far as the types of work I do, I specialize in public relations and writing for clients. I do other types of work related to these, but these are my primary focus.

How did you choose your niche(s)?

My background screams tech. My tech experience began when I was working at the Ohio Supercomputer Center. I also worked at CompuServe and later I moved to Silicon Valley and worked for Silicon Graphics. (I realize not everyone will recognize those names, but techies might!) Then, I worked for an agency started by Andi Cunningham, who worked as the PR lead for Steve Jobs. There, I worked with companies like Adobe and HP. So my tech niche chose me.

I chose manufacturing because I’ve always enjoyed helping these companies tell their stories. I don’t think they always understand how interesting their stories are. They may not even recognize that they have stories to tell. Some of my client companies are 50+ years old and have compelling stories, customers and thought leaders that make great materials for a PR pro to work with.

Who are the clients you work with?

My favorite clients are those in the B2B sector with a smaller marketing team – sometimes a team of one.

They probably don’t have an in-house PR resource but want to have an ongoing public relations program. They usually don’t have the budget to hire an agency (and frankly, an agency could be overkill for a smaller company), so a consultant can be a good fit.

I also enjoy working with companies in the smaller business category – 500 employees or less.

What types of projects do you work on?

My favorite clients work with me on ongoing programs that include writing as well as media outreach and strategy. I can help clients write content, place the content and promote the content. I see PR, content and social media all working together. I like to make sure my clients are utilizing every avenue to amplify any earned media coverage I secure for them. I also like to see clients getting more out of their owned media (=content) by turning it into earned media (=PR) when feasible.

Where do you freelance from?

Columbus, Ohio is where I’m currently based. I started my consulting practice when I lived in Sunnyvale, California (the Bay Area).

Tell us about two tools you rely on to run your business.

I do love a good ol’-fashioned notebook and nice pen to make a daily to-do list!

I use tech tools, as well. One of my current favorites is CoverageBook. It creates pretty coverage reports with metrics I can share with clients. They love those reports – and CoverageBook makes it easy to create them.

Name one thing that’s surprised you about freelancing.

When I started my freelance business, I lived out in the Bay Area where it was pretty common to work for yourself. When I relocated back to the Midwest, I found it wasn’t as common. That was hard because I had such great support from my fellow freelancers out there. Trying to make my business work from here was tough, but because I work with clients all over the U.S. (and sometimes international clients, as well), I was able to keep the business going.

There isn’t the same community of freelancers here, sadly. I tried to start a local group in Columbus where freelancers could turn to support each other. That lasted maybe a year and a half.

When that wound down, I decided to try a Twitter chat to help support other freelancers. #FreelanceChat turned five in September, and many freelancers have told me how helpful it’s been for them. It makes me very happy to hear that the community created through the chat has helped them feel supported and be more successful as freelancers.

There is so much BAD advice out there that I feel passionately about giving freelancers a place to turn for advice that is not only free but also valuable. I think freelancers who attend the chat genuinely enjoy supporting each other. For all the things you hear about how toxic social media can be, the chat community is one place where freelancers can turn to feel supported. It’s a very positive vibe.

🟠 (Editor’s note: Unfortunately, #FreelanceChat is currently on hiatus. Michelle is looking for a new home for the chat due to Twitter/X’s declining functionality.) 🟠

I’ll add one more little story that popped into my head. When I moved back to Columbus, I reached out to self-employed PR and communications folks to connect and get my legs under me. While most were very supportive, I’ll never forget the response I received from one woman who had her own consulting business. I sent her a note to introduce myself and ask her if she would like to meet for coffee.

She replied, “Why would I want to meet with you? You’re my competition.” I was aghast. But I NEVER forgot it. That’s one of the reasons I feel so strongly about helping other freelancers. The Maya Angelou quote I often think of is, “People will forget what you say. People will forget what you do. But people will never forget how you made them feel.” I try to live by that.

I’ve always enjoyed helping these companies tell their stories. I don’t think they always understand how interesting their stories are. They may not even recognize that they have stories to tell.

Made any big mistakes during your freelance journey?

Hmmm … a couple things. For years, I didn’t invoice at the start of a project. That worked fine – until it didn’t. Now I always get something upfront. Maybe it’s a deposit or partial payment, but something.

Another thing is that I probably did too much hourly billing. Now I bill on a retainer or project basis.

What are you proudest of with your business?

I’m really proud that I’ve been freelancing for 20+ years now. I remember thinking, “Well, if this doesn’t work out, I can always go back and get a job working for someone else.” Fortunately, I’ve never had to do that. Not that there haven’t been ups and downs, but I’ve made this work for all these years.

I’m also proud that my vision to provide expert PR and writing services to clients at a price they can afford – as an alternative to an agency that may charge much more and pair up clients with less experienced practitioners – has resonated with clients over the years.

You mentioned all the advice out there for freelancers. What advice do you agree with?

There’s not just one way to do anything. You should find the way to do things that works best for YOU.

Also, be careful whose advice you follow. So much of the advice out there isn’t designed to actually help but is instead designed for the person giving the advice to try to sell you something. Use care.

What common advice do you disagree with?

My favorite is when someone says something like, “Freelancing is simple – just bill XX hours at XX rate.” NO. It is NOT that simple.

What areas of opportunities do you see for current or future freelancers?

I think freelancers can do a lot of things to brand and market themselves. If they’re a career freelancer and an expert in their specialty, for example, they might consider developing a course or other types of products that can give them some passive income and perhaps lead to more paying clients.

I’m a big advocate of working for yourself in spite of the ups and downs that come with it. Yes, there are lows – but the highs are pretty high.

Find Michelle online at michellegarrett.com, connect on LinkedIn or follow her on Twitter/X, Threads or Facebook

How I Freelance: Jessica Walrack

How I Freelance: Jessica Walrack

Freelancing is less lonely when you’re part of a community.

That’s one of the reasons freelance writer Jessica Walrack started All Things Freelance Writing, a resource for other writers who are building and growing their own businesses.

Jessica also knew firsthand how hard it can be to take your freelance business in a different direction when things aren’t working. After seven years of freelancing, she made some major adjustments to the type of work she offered – and the shift eliminated some of the burnout and bottlenecks she was experiencing.

Read on to discover how Jessica uses her struggles to help other freelancers feel less alone and provide opportunities for them to connect with work they truly enjoy.

When and why did you start freelancing?

I started freelancing in 2013. I was freelance writing on the side as a way to earn extra money while ramping up a different online business. The writing ended up taking off, so I ditched the other business and went all in!

What niche(s) do you work in?

Finance blogs and articles. After seven or so years as a generalist writer, I was tired of dealing with issues within my business and got serious about trying to fix them. Some of those issues were feast and famine, limited inbound, price objections and workflow bottlenecks.

I began looking for the type of work I already did that was the most profitable, enjoyable and in demand. It just so happened to be finance blogs. I experimented with tailoring my LinkedIn profile to finance blogs and had an overwhelming response of inbound service requests. I’ve been on that track ever since!

Who are the clients you work with?

I write long-form blog posts and news stories for national news outlets such as CBS News and US News & World, media publishing companies like Investopedia and Forbes Advisor, and B2B SaaS companies in the finance industry.

Where do you freelance from?

I’m currently settled in the Boise, Idaho, area, although I spent the first seven years of my business traveling abroad (Costa Rica, all over Europe, Cyprus and Mexico).

Tell us about the tools you rely on to run your business.

Google Workspace for Docs, Sheets, Forms and Gmail. Plus Grammarly, which is always watching over my shoulder. While I don’t trust it blindly, it’s super helpful for catching little typos.

Name one thing that’s surprised you about freelancing.

I was truly blown away by the amazing communities of freelance writers on Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram. Most of the freelancers I’ve met are extremely open, friendly, collaborative and supportive. It’s a beautiful thing because building a business as a solopreneur can be very lonely and challenging.

Made any big mistakes during your freelance journey?

One big mistake I’ve made is not listening to my gut. Sometimes, you get presented with an opportunity and have a feeling it’s going to be problematic but accept it anyway. Those gut feelings always end up being right!

I’ve gotten better at spotting and heeding red flags, but I still end up on problematic projects every once in a while. They can really hold you back by eating up more time and energy than they’re worth.

Most of the freelancers I’ve met are extremely open, friendly, collaborative and supportive. It’s a beautiful thing because building a business as a solopreneur can be very lonely and challenging.

What are you proudest of with your business?

I’d say I’m proudest that I’ve aligned my business to the parameters that I set out to achieve. I won’t get into all the details, but a few years ago I was in a bad place with my business and suffering on many levels.

I made a very specific plan to improve and wrote it down in detail. I had my doubts but was committed. It took about a year and a half, but my business eventually aligned with the plan.

The whole experience taught me that, without a doubt, clear intentions, persistence and faith can open new doors.

There’s lots of advice out there for freelancers. What advice do you agree with?

One common piece of advice I agree with is to adopt a business owner mindset. It’s easy to fall into the employee role, even though you’re running a freelance business. But that’s a quick way to build a business that feels more like a prison than a key to freedom.

If you don’t have clear and firm boundaries, some clients will push as far as they can for as little pay as possible. And it’s your time, life and health on the line! We can all hustle for a while – but burnout will eventually come if you don’t take the reins and operate in a sustainable way.

What common advice do you disagree with?

Niching down right away as the rule. By starting out as a generalist, you can get your feet wet, experiment, and then make the niching decision based on experience and research.

If you niche down right out of the gate:

🟠 You may find you don’t like writing about what you thought you’d like to write about.

🟠 What you find most interesting may not be in demand in the market.

🟠 Companies in certain industries may not have the budgets necessary to pay your rates.

🟠 You can limit your opportunities.

Sometimes it can make sense to niche down right away, but testing the waters is often a safer bet.

What areas of opportunities do you see for current or future freelancers?

I think companies and publications are going to need human-centered content and copy that features unique insights from subject matter experts more than ever before.

You have some great resources for freelance writers – tell us about them!

If writers want help finding work and building their businesses, they can subscribe to the free All Things Freelance Writing Jobs email. It goes out every Friday at 8 a.m. Eastern with at least 20 new freelance writing opportunities and some other helpful resources.

Want to connect with Jessica? Find her online at jessicawalrack.com or connect on LinkedIn, X or Instagram. You can also join the All Things Freelance Writing community on the web, LinkedIn or Instagram.